It Was a Dark and Stormy Night (First Line)

It Was a Dark and Stormy Night

It was a dark and stormy night; the rain fell in torrents, except at occasional intervals, when it was checked by a violent gust of wind which swept up the streets (for it is in London that our scene lies), rattling along the house-tops, and fiercely agitating the scanty flame of the lamps that struggled against the darkness. —Edward George Bulwer-Lytton, Paul Clifford (1830)

Learn why this particular first line matters.

More great books.

The Catcher in the Rye (First Line)

The Catcher in the Rye

‘If you really want to hear about it, the first thing you’ll probably want to know is where I was born, and what my lousy childhood was like, and how my parents were occupied and all before they had me, and all that David Copperfield kind of crap, but I don’t feel like going into it, if you want to know the truth. —J. D. Salinger,

(1951)

John E. McIntyre’s trigger warning

“Take a seat, school’s back in session. Here’s John E. McIntyre’s “trigger warning” to new students at his editing class at Loyola University Maryland.”

John E. McIntyre’s trigger warning

This is a fun, yet honest look at how one editing professor considers his journalism class. I agree.

Meanwhile, see The Associated Press Stylebook 2018: and Briefing on Media Law 

 

Saul Bellow on Chicago

I am an American, Chicago born—Chicago, that somber city—and go at things as I have taught myself, free-style, and will make the record in my own way: first to knock, first admitted; sometimes an innocent knock, sometimes a not so innocent. —Saul Bellow, The Adventures of Augie March (1953)

Lloyd Jones, Mr. Pip

But you know, Matilda, you cannot pretend to read a book. Your eyes will give you away. So will your breathing. A person entranced by a book simply forgets to breathe. The house can catch alight and a reader deep in a book will not look up until the wallpaper is in flames. For me, Matilda, Great Expectations is such a book. It gave me permission to change my life.
― Lloyd Jones, Mr. Pip